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  • The Nelson Collection website has been created to help raise awareness of a golden era in the global development of photography as an art form. The development of photography in Iran during the Qajar era (1785 - 1925) was given initial impetus by the accession of Nasser al-Din Shah in 1848, who not only took a keen interest in the early photographic techniques that were emerging at that time (ten years after the birth of commercial photography), but also took up photography himself. A golden era of photography was to subsequently emerge in Iran that spanned the period from the mid-1840s to the mid-1920s, where Iranian and European photographers produced bodies of work that captured not only life in the royal court and architectural imagery, but also recorded the lives of the people of Iran and the rich diversity of the country's society. Amongst the most noteworthy Iranian photographers included Mirza Reza Akkasbash (1843 -1889), Abdullah Mirza Qajar (1850 -1909) and Antoin Sevruguin (1840s -1933), whilst European photographers such as Jules Richard (1816 - 1891), Luigi Pesce (1818 -1891), Dmitri Ivanovich Ermakov (1846 - 1916) and Ernst Höltzer (1835 -1911) also made meaningful contributions to the recording of Iran's history and its people. Despite the quality and historical relevance of the photography being produced in 19th Century Iran, images from the Qajar period are uncommon and certainly much more so than photographic representations of say, Egypt, the Ottoman Empire or Palestine. The rareness of photographic images from this period is particularly the case when it comes to Antoin Sevruguin's body of work, following the destruction of some 5,000 glass plate negatives in 1908 and the later confiscation of the remaining 2,000 negatives that represented his life's work during the reign of Riza Shah Pahlavi, whose accession took place in 1925. One of the largest collections of glass plate negatives known to exist today is held in the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Archives at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. The collection consists of 695 glass plate negatives. Copyright | Citations All rights reserved. It is the responsibility of the user to determine and satisfy copyright, or other use restrictions (such as donor restrictions, privacy rights, licensing, and trademarks) when publishing, or otherwise distributing content from the collection. In such circumstances, citations must include: "© The Nelson Collection of Qajar Photography" and the name of the photographer and negative number, if available.

     

    The Nelson Collection website has been created to help raise awareness of a golden era in the global development of photography as an art form.

     

    The development of photography in Iran during the Qajar era (1785 - 1925) was given initial impetus by the accession of Nasser al-Din Shah in 1848, who not only took a keen interest in the early photographic techniques that were emerging at that time (ten years after the birth of commercial photography), but also took up photography himself. A golden era of photography was to subsequently emerge in Iran that spanned the period from the mid-1840s to the mid-1920s, where Iranian and European photographers produced bodies of work that captured not only life in the royal court and architectural imagery, but also recorded the lives of the people of Iran and the rich diversity of the country's society. Amongst the most noteworthy Iranian photographers included Mirza Reza Akkasbash (1843 -1889), Abdullah Mirza Qajar (1850 -1909) and Antoin Sevruguin (1840s -1933), whilst European photographers such as Jules Richard (1816 - 1891), Luigi Pesce (1818 -1891), Dmitri Ivanovich Ermakov (1846 - 1916) and Ernst Höltzer (1835 -1911) also made meaningful contributions to the recording of Iran's history and its people.

     

    Despite the quality and historical relevance of the photography being produced in 19th Century Iran, images from the Qajar period are uncommon and certainly much more so than photographic representations of say, Egypt, the Ottoman Empire or Palestine. The rareness of photographic images from this period is particularly the case when it comes to Antoin Sevruguin's body of work, following the destruction of some 5,000 glass plate negatives in 1908 and the later confiscation of the remaining 2,000 negatives that represented his life's work during the reign of Riza Shah Pahlavi, whose accession took place in 1925. One of the largest collections of glass plate negatives known to exist today is held in the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Archives at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. The collection consists of 695 glass plate negatives.

     

    Copyright | Citations

    All rights reserved. It is the responsibility of the user to determine and satisfy copyright, or other use restrictions (such as donor restrictions, privacy rights, licensing, and trademarks) when publishing, or otherwise distributing content from the collection. In such circumstances, citations must include: "© The Nelson Collection of Qajar Photography" and the name of the photographer and negative number, if available.

  • The Nelson Collection website has been created to help raise awareness of a golden era in the global development of photography as an art form. The development of photography in Iran during the Qajar era (1785 - 1925) was given initial impetus by the accession of Nasser al-Din Shah in 1848, who not only took a keen interest in the early photographic techniques that were emerging at that time (ten years after the birth of commercial photography), but also took up photography himself. A golden era of photography was to subsequently emerge in Iran that spanned the period from the mid-1840s to the mid-1920s, where Iranian and European photographers produced bodies of work that captured not only life in the royal court and architectural imagery, but also recorded the lives of the people of Iran and the rich diversity of the country's society. Amongst the most noteworthy Iranian photographers included Mirza Reza Akkasbash (1843 -1889), Abdullah Mirza Qajar (1850 -1909) and Antoin Sevruguin (1840s -1933), whilst European photographers such as Jules Richard (1816 - 1891), Luigi Pesce (1818 -1891), Dmitri Ivanovich Ermakov (1846 - 1916) and Ernst Höltzer (1835 -1911) also made meaningful contributions to the recording of Iran's history and its people. Despite the quality and historical relevance of the photography being produced in 19th Century Iran, images from the Qajar period are uncommon and certainly much more so than photographic representations of say, Egypt, the Ottoman Empire or Palestine. The rareness of photographic images from this period is particularly the case when it comes to Antoin Sevruguin's body of work, following the destruction of some 5,000 glass plate negatives in 1908 and the later confiscation of the remaining 2,000 negatives that represented his life's work during the reign of Riza Shah Pahlavi, whose accession took place in 1925. One of the largest collections of glass plate negatives known to exist today is held in the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Archives at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. The collection consists of 695 glass plate negatives. Copyright | Citations All rights reserved. It is the responsibility of the user to determine and satisfy copyright, or other use restrictions (such as donor restrictions, privacy rights, licensing, and trademarks) when publishing, or otherwise distributing content from the collection. In such circumstances, citations must include: "© The Nelson Collection of Qajar Photography" and the name of the photographer and negative number, if available.

     

    The Nelson Collection website has been created to help raise awareness of a golden era in the global development of photography as an art form.

     

    The development of photography in Iran during the Qajar era (1785 - 1925) was given initial impetus by the accession of Nasser al-Din Shah in 1848, who not only took a keen interest in the early photographic techniques that were emerging at that time (ten years after the birth of commercial photography), but also took up photography himself. A golden era of photography was to subsequently emerge in Iran that spanned the period from the mid-1840s to the mid-1920s, where Iranian and European photographers produced bodies of work that captured not only life in the royal court and architectural imagery, but also recorded the lives of the people of Iran and the rich diversity of the country's society. Amongst the most noteworthy Iranian photographers included Mirza Reza Akkasbash (1843 -1889), Abdullah Mirza Qajar (1850 -1909) and Antoin Sevruguin (1840s -1933), whilst European photographers such as Jules Richard (1816 - 1891), Luigi Pesce (1818 -1891), Dmitri Ivanovich Ermakov (1846 - 1916) and Ernst Höltzer (1835 -1911) also made meaningful contributions to the recording of Iran's history and its people.

     

    Despite the quality and historical relevance of the photography being produced in 19th Century Iran, images from the Qajar period are uncommon and certainly much more so than photographic representations of say, Egypt, the Ottoman Empire or Palestine. The rareness of photographic images from this period is particularly the case when it comes to Antoin Sevruguin's body of work, following the destruction of some 5,000 glass plate negatives in 1908 and the later confiscation of the remaining 2,000 negatives that represented his life's work during the reign of Riza Shah Pahlavi, whose accession took place in 1925. One of the largest collections of glass plate negatives known to exist today is held in the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Archives at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. The collection consists of 695 glass plate negatives.

     

    Copyright | Citations

    All rights reserved. It is the responsibility of the user to determine and satisfy copyright, or other use restrictions (such as donor restrictions, privacy rights, licensing, and trademarks) when publishing, or otherwise distributing content from the collection. In such circumstances, citations must include: "© The Nelson Collection of Qajar Photography" and the name of the photographer and negative number, if available.

  • The Nelson Collection website has been created to help raise awareness of a golden era in the global development of photography as an art form. The development of photography in Iran during the Qajar era (1785 - 1925) was given initial impetus by the accession of Nasser al-Din Shah in 1848, who not only took a keen interest in the early photographic techniques that were emerging at that time (ten years after the birth of commercial photography), but also took up photography himself. A golden era of photography was to subsequently emerge in Iran that spanned the period from the mid-1840s to the mid-1920s, where Iranian and European photographers produced bodies of work that captured not only life in the royal court and architectural imagery, but also recorded the lives of the people of Iran and the rich diversity of the country's society. Amongst the most noteworthy Iranian photographers included Mirza Reza Akkasbash (1843 -1889), Abdullah Mirza Qajar (1850 -1909) and Antoin Sevruguin (1840s -1933), whilst European photographers such as Jules Richard (1816 - 1891), Luigi Pesce (1818 -1891), Dmitri Ivanovich Ermakov (1846 - 1916) and Ernst Höltzer (1835 -1911) also made meaningful contributions to the recording of Iran's history and its people. Despite the quality and historical relevance of the photography being produced in 19th Century Iran, images from the Qajar period are uncommon and certainly much more so than photographic representations of say, Egypt, the Ottoman Empire or Palestine. The rareness of photographic images from this period is particularly the case when it comes to Antoin Sevruguin's body of work, following the destruction of some 5,000 glass plate negatives in 1908 and the later confiscation of the remaining 2,000 negatives that represented his life's work during the reign of Riza Shah Pahlavi, whose accession took place in 1925. One of the largest collections of glass plate negatives known to exist today is held in the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Archives at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. The collection consists of 695 glass plate negatives. Copyright | Citations All rights reserved. It is the responsibility of the user to determine and satisfy copyright, or other use restrictions (such as donor restrictions, privacy rights, licensing, and trademarks) when publishing, or otherwise distributing content from the collection. In such circumstances, citations must include: "© The Nelson Collection of Qajar Photography" and the name of the photographer and negative number, if available.

     

    The Nelson Collection website has been created to help raise awareness of a golden era in the global development of photography as an art form.

     

    The development of photography in Iran during the Qajar era (1785 - 1925) was given initial impetus by the accession of Nasser al-Din Shah in 1848, who not only took a keen interest in the early photographic techniques that were emerging at that time (ten years after the birth of commercial photography), but also took up photography himself. A golden era of photography was to subsequently emerge in Iran that spanned the period from the mid-1840s to the mid-1920s, where Iranian and European photographers produced bodies of work that captured not only life in the royal court and architectural imagery, but also recorded the lives of the people of Iran and the rich diversity of the country's society. Amongst the most noteworthy Iranian photographers included Mirza Reza Akkasbash (1843 -1889), Abdullah Mirza Qajar (1850 -1909) and Antoin Sevruguin (1840s -1933), whilst European photographers such as Jules Richard (1816 - 1891), Luigi Pesce (1818 -1891), Dmitri Ivanovich Ermakov (1846 - 1916) and Ernst Höltzer (1835 -1911) also made meaningful contributions to the recording of Iran's history and its people.

     

    Despite the quality and historical relevance of the photography being produced in 19th Century Iran, images from the Qajar period are uncommon and certainly much more so than photographic representations of say, Egypt, the Ottoman Empire or Palestine. The rareness of photographic images from this period is particularly the case when it comes to Antoin Sevruguin's body of work, following the destruction of some 5,000 glass plate negatives in 1908 and the later confiscation of the remaining 2,000 negatives that represented his life's work during the reign of Riza Shah Pahlavi, whose accession took place in 1925. One of the largest collections of glass plate negatives known to exist today is held in the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Archives at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. The collection consists of 695 glass plate negatives.

     

    Copyright | Citations

    All rights reserved. It is the responsibility of the user to determine and satisfy copyright, or other use restrictions (such as donor restrictions, privacy rights, licensing, and trademarks) when publishing, or otherwise distributing content from the collection. In such circumstances, citations must include: "© The Nelson Collection of Qajar Photography" and the name of the photographer and negative number, if available.

  • The Nelson Collection website has been created to help raise awareness of a golden era in the global development of photography as an art form. The development of photography in Iran during the Qajar era (1785 - 1925) was given initial impetus by the accession of Nasser al-Din Shah in 1848, who not only took a keen interest in the early photographic techniques that were emerging at that time (ten years after the birth of commercial photography), but also took up photography himself. A golden era of photography was to subsequently emerge in Iran that spanned the period from the mid-1840s to the mid-1920s, where Iranian and European photographers produced bodies of work that captured not only life in the royal court and architectural imagery, but also recorded the lives of the people of Iran and the rich diversity of the country's society. Amongst the most noteworthy Iranian photographers included Mirza Reza Akkasbash (1843 -1889), Abdullah Mirza Qajar (1850 -1909) and Antoin Sevruguin (1840s -1933), whilst European photographers such as Jules Richard (1816 - 1891), Luigi Pesce (1818 -1891), Dmitri Ivanovich Ermakov (1846 - 1916) and Ernst Höltzer (1835 -1911) also made meaningful contributions to the recording of Iran's history and its people. Despite the quality and historical relevance of the photography being produced in 19th Century Iran, images from the Qajar period are uncommon and certainly much more so than photographic representations of say, Egypt, the Ottoman Empire or Palestine. The rareness of photographic images from this period is particularly the case when it comes to Antoin Sevruguin's body of work, following the destruction of some 5,000 glass plate negatives in 1908 and the later confiscation of the remaining 2,000 negatives that represented his life's work during the reign of Riza Shah Pahlavi, whose accession took place in 1925. One of the largest collections of glass plate negatives known to exist today is held in the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Archives at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. The collection consists of 695 glass plate negatives. Copyright | Citations All rights reserved. It is the responsibility of the user to determine and satisfy copyright, or other use restrictions (such as donor restrictions, privacy rights, licensing, and trademarks) when publishing, or otherwise distributing content from the collection. In such circumstances, citations must include: "© The Nelson Collection of Qajar Photography" and the name of the photographer and negative number, if available.

     

    The Nelson Collection website has been created to help raise awareness of a golden era in the global development of photography as an art form.

     

    The development of photography in Iran during the Qajar era (1785 - 1925) was given initial impetus by the accession of Nasser al-Din Shah in 1848, who not only took a keen interest in the early photographic techniques that were emerging at that time (ten years after the birth of commercial photography), but also took up photography himself. A golden era of photography was to subsequently emerge in Iran that spanned the period from the mid-1840s to the mid-1920s, where Iranian and European photographers produced bodies of work that captured not only life in the royal court and architectural imagery, but also recorded the lives of the people of Iran and the rich diversity of the country's society. Amongst the most noteworthy Iranian photographers included Mirza Reza Akkasbash (1843 -1889), Abdullah Mirza Qajar (1850 -1909) and Antoin Sevruguin (1840s -1933), whilst European photographers such as Jules Richard (1816 - 1891), Luigi Pesce (1818 -1891), Dmitri Ivanovich Ermakov (1846 - 1916) and Ernst Höltzer (1835 -1911) also made meaningful contributions to the recording of Iran's history and its people.

     

    Despite the quality and historical relevance of the photography being produced in 19th Century Iran, images from the Qajar period are uncommon and certainly much more so than photographic representations of say, Egypt, the Ottoman Empire or Palestine. The rareness of photographic images from this period is particularly the case when it comes to Antoin Sevruguin's body of work, following the destruction of some 5,000 glass plate negatives in 1908 and the later confiscation of the remaining 2,000 negatives that represented his life's work during the reign of Riza Shah Pahlavi, whose accession took place in 1925. One of the largest collections of glass plate negatives known to exist today is held in the Freer Gallery of Art and the Arthur M. Sackler Archives at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington. The collection consists of 695 glass plate negatives.

     

    Copyright | Citations

    All rights reserved. It is the responsibility of the user to determine and satisfy copyright, or other use restrictions (such as donor restrictions, privacy rights, licensing, and trademarks) when publishing, or otherwise distributing content from the collection. In such circumstances, citations must include: "© The Nelson Collection of Qajar Photography" and the name of the photographer and negative number, if available.